In Progress

Following are some projects Daniel Taylor is currently working on (some more than others).

LIES AND OTHER STORIES
A Play

Daniel Taylor: “I wrote a piece on my mother’s battle with Alzheimer’s entitled “I Tell My Mother Lies.” And I am currently working on a companion piece on my father, tentatively called “I Tell My Father’s Stories.” I’m trying to balance the negative picture of him that comes through in the piece on my mother, but am not confident that I am succeeding.

“In reviewing the piece on my mother, I realized it was almost all scenes, tied together with ongoing commentary. So I decided to make a one-act play out of it, which I have done. I am also working combing the two pieces into a single, full-length play.”

DEATH COMES FOR THE DECONSTRUCTIONIST

Daniel Taylor: “This is long labor of love, which I have long thought was likely destined to be an unrequited love. But this world is passing strange and it now develops that the novel will appear, most likely in late 2014, in the Slant fiction imprint of Wipf and Stock, directed by Gregory Wolfe (Image).

“The novel follows a hapless, haunted, faux detective with a mentally disabled side-kick sister looking to solve the murder of a former professor of his. (My wife and I ran a group home full of ‘challenged’ adults with mental disabilities for three years, and one of them is a model for Judy in the novel.) In telling this fictional story, I have learned to love the sidekick sister—and her stammering love for her damaged brother—just as I loved many years ago the afflicted woman on whom the character is based.”

Click to read an EXCERPT

RUMINATION NIGHTS

Daniel Taylor: “I have this vision of an on-stage narrator talking informally about his life and the human experience generally—ranging from eternity past to eternity future. The fellow is simultaneously wise, obtuse, funny, hopeful, despairing, full of faith, full of doubt—but always interesting, sometimes spell-binding. He mostly tells and reflects on stories, and as he tells them they sometimes are acted out beside and behind him. Sometimes he enters into the story he is telling as a character himself, sometimes he simply stops and listens with the audience.

“There is a lot of music and sometimes art in any given performance. As he speaks a large reproduction of a painting or photograph might flash up on a screen that re-enforces the mood or theme of his words. Sometimes he talks about it directly. Sometimes music will serve the same function, perhaps a live performance by another performer. Maybe a Willie Nelson or Fernando Ortega song. Maybe I could get my friend Bob Dylan if he’s not too busy. (No, I don’t know Bob Dylan.)

“Issues of faith and meaning will arise often, but not obtrusively. Making sense out of life would be a recurring theme. If one of these came into being and worked, I could see doing others. (There’s lot to talk about.)”